FAQs

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There is very good scientific evidence that maintaining a positive state of mind improves your chances of a successful pregnancy. This means avoiding stressful situations and having mechanisms to cope with stresses that arise.

At ESIS Health Services (EHS), we believe in providing a holistic approach to have a successful IVF outcome. Visit our website to know how we can guide you through this journey.

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Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after a year of regular unprotected intercourse.

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  • Ovulation becomes infrequent or stops;
  • Periods are irregular and/or heavy;
  • Natural conception is reduced;
  • Therapies to help ovulation are not as successful;
  • There is a higher chance of miscarriage.

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  • A well balanced nutritional diet 3-4 months prior to conception maximises the chance of conception and live birth. This is true for both natural conception as well as IVF & ICSI.
  • Folic acid taken daily reduces neural tube defects;
  • Reducing stress improves ovulation and the chance of spontaneous conception;
  • High caffeine intake decreases fertility;
  • Smoking
    • increases the incidence of infertility 3 times;
    • reduces the response to fertility drugs;
    • increases the risk of ectopic pregnancy;
    • increases the miscarriage rate;
    • increases fetal abnormalities.

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The HSG is an X-ray of the uterus and tubes, it tells whether the tubes are open or blocked. It gives little information about the outside of the tubes & the pelvis and whether there is any endometriosis or evidence of previous infection. A hysteroscopy and/or a laparoscopy does all these things, both of which carry small but definite risks.

Therefore we usually arrange an HSG first and only if there are any abnormalities seen do we recommend a hysteroscopy or a laparoscopy. A normal HSG result usually also means that the laparoscopy will be normal.

We recommend diagnostic Hysteroscopy in preparation for IUI and IVF cycle for a higher success rate in your journey.

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. An intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycle takes approximately two weeks (with or without ovarian stimulation medications). In vitro fertilization (IVF) generally takes between 4-6 weeks including the egg retrieval. Embryo transfer usually takes place between 3-5 days later.

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The hormone medicines you have to take in order to stimulate your ovaries may make you feel tired as your estrogen levels increase due to extra eggs being produced. Some people may also experience mild mood swings, breast tenderness or bloating. You can carry on with all your usual daily work but heavy exercise and impact sport is to be avoided.

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A maximum of two embryos will be transferred to the uterus for possible implantation. Even by limiting the embryos transferred, we still encounter twin pregnancies in approximately 25% of our patients. Any excess good embryos will be frozen and can be used for a future ivf cycle.

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  • As a woman gets older, her fertility reduces.
  • This is more apparent once she crosses the age of 35.
  • The risk of miscarriage also increases with age e.g.:
    • below 25 years, the miscarriage rate is 7%.
    • above 40 years, the risk rises sharply to between 30% and 50%.
Age <25 25-35 36-40 >40
Miscarriage Rate 7% 10%-15% 20%-25% 30%-50%

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If you have already gone through menopause, you will need to consider using donor eggs in order to get pregnant.

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There is a spectrum of fertility treatments and every patient is different. At your initial consultation, your doctor will discuss the various treatment options with you and following a complete evaluation, she will make her recommendations. For some patients this will mean starting with IVF, but often less invasive and less expensive treatments are the appropriate way to begin.

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We take a medical history and perform semen analyses on every male coming to our office for fertility issues. If anything significant is uncovered, we will refer you to an urologist who specializes in evaluating and treating male fertility issues.

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Current research on COVID-19 and its effects on fertility is limited. However, the results are reassuring with no evidence of mother-to-baby transmission during pregnancy. The available evidence does not suggest any serious consequences for fetal development, newborn babies, or women in pregnancy.

Our advice is low-risk patients going through assisted reproduction (such as IVF) are unlikely to be at any higher risk of complications than anyone else in the population.

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If you test positive for COVID-19 you will be required to self-isolate and this may result in a pause in your fertility or IVF treatment, depending on what stage you are at. Your doctor will advise on what steps need to be taken to ensure your safety and the safety of our staff and fellow patients.

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We will manage our staff and patient volumes carefully to minimise waiting room congestion and ensure social distancing rules can be adhered to. Our fertility specialists, nurses, counsellors and administrators will continue to utilise telehealth and virtual appointments where it’s appropriate.

However, there are certain procedures where social distancing is not possible, such as egg collection, embryo transfer, blood tests and scans. In these instances the use of appropriate protective equipment will be implemented.

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If you or any member of your household are feeling unwell or displaying any symptoms, no matter how mild, you should self-isolate immediately and contact your primary health care professional (i.e. GP), clinic or nursing team for further instructions.